copies of diisonance have arrived

diisonance is back from the printers . . . and it contains artworks by Steve Ryan & paul hawkins, as well as new, collaborative & experimental poetry by Sarer Scotthorne, Miggy Angel, Andrew Jeffrey, Janine Ellul, Roy McFarlane, Linda Kemp, Passy Kulmisli, Rowan Evans, Leire Barrera, Dan Eltringham, Seni Seneviratne, Emteaz Hussain, paul hawkins, George Askwith, Vertaa Lune, Maachouq Hamza, & Mark Wood.

It will be launched during Steve Ryan & paul hawkins’ diisonance exhibition & events at between Sept 1-30 at The Gallery Cafe, St. Margarets House, 21 Old Ford Road London E2 9PL​

Sept 8 diisonance book launch w/Sarer Scotthorne, Roy McFarlane, Tony White, paul hawkins & special guest Gary Budden more tbc, entry by donation

 

 

diisonance book launch Sept 8

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diisonance contains artworks by Steve Ryan & paul hawkins, as well as new, collaborative & experimental poetry by Sarer Scotthorne, Miggy Angel, Andrew Jeffrey, Janine Ellul, Roy McFarlane, Linda Kemp, Passy Kulmisli, Rowan Evans, Leire Barrera, Dan Eltringham, Seni Seneviratne, Emteaz Hussain, paul hawkins, George Askwith, Vertaa Lune, Maachouq Hamza, & Mark Wood.
It was made during, or to perform at diisonance, an exhibition of artworks by Steve Ryan & paul hawkins in June 2017 at Bank Street Arts, Sheffield. diisonance is a collaboration, part of a jigsaw, the genesis of which is shared experiences; Steve & paul met in the early 90’s squatting in Claremont Road, east London at the height of anti-road protests, poll-tax riots & dissent. They’ve tried to piece together the past from the future, making sense of the ghosts that stay with them & the shared feelings of confusion & love for their entwined topics; politicised, faltering, broken & rebuilt many times over. diisonance began as a response to Place Waste Dissent (Influx Press 2015) by paul hawkins.

June 21 – 24 diisonance exhibition & events at Bank Street Arts, Sheffield, with thanks to SIX Project Space, Bank Street Arts and 612media. ​Supported using public funding by the National Lottery through Arts Council England.

You can watch film of all diisonance performances here

more diisonance . . .

Sept 1 – 30 diisonance exhibition & events at The Gallery Cafe, St. Margarets House, 21 Old Ford Road London E2 9PL​

Sept 8 diisonance book launch w/Sarer Scotthorne, Roy McFarlane, Tony White, paul hawkins & special guest Gary Budden more tbc, entry by donation

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more info here

Hesterglock Press / Caplet collaboration Sept 29

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Sept 29: hestercap / letglock: diisonance ii

with Jonathan Mann, paul hawkins, Jude Cowan Montague, Matti Spence, more tbc entry by donation

As part of Steve Ryan & paul hawkins’ diisonance exhibition / events throughout Sept at The Gallery Cafe, St. Margarets House, 21 Old Ford Road, London E2 9PL, the experimental press Hesterglock Press joins forces with London-based poetry reading and discussion series Caplet to bring you an evening of collaborative poetries in dialogue. Exploring diisonance’s ongoing theme of miscommunication and chaos, six leading innovative poets will read specially-commissioned works, and then discuss their work. As is usual with a Caplet event, members of the audience will have the opportunity the ask the poets questions, and – who knows – perhaps also take part in the performance.

more info on Caplet here
and there’s a FB event page here

diisonance is a collaboration, part of a jigsaw, the genesis of which is shared experiences; Steve and paul met in the early nineties squatting in Claremont Road, east London at the height of anti-road protests, poll-tax riots and dissent. They’ve tried to piece together the past from the future, making sense of the ghosts that stay with them and the trust they offer one another clarify’s shared feelings of confusion and love for their entwined topics; politicised, faltering, broken and rebuilt many times over.
paul has written extensively on his experiences of squatting/protesting against the building of the M11 Link Road through east London, most recently in Place Waste Dissent (Influx Press 2015), which ‘plots the run-off, rackets and 90’s resistance to the proposed M11 Link Road; text experiments and collage from Claremont Road to Cameron. Memory traces re-surface the A12, words fight for space – and on occasion lose – against the images of police officers, residents, stilt walkers and emptied streets’. It also includes some of Steve’s iconic photography.
In diisonance Steve’s collaborative starting point is responding to Place Waste Dissent, with further memory travels and exotic imaginings. paul continues absorbing and responding to Steve’s artworks, and over time new psychological assemblages have evolved to pay tribute to the ghosts before they are laid to rest.

The Intaglio Poems book launch in Auckland

Iain will be reading poems from his latest collection THE INTAGLIO POEMS at TIME OUT BOOKSTORE in Mt Eden, which will also involve six of the very finest poets in and around Auckland. The reading will start at 7pm on Friday 11 August. Phantom Billstickers will generously be helping to promote the reading by placing posters around the city.

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Please spread the word! The more the merrier! The following poets are really worth it – they are unique, original and incredibly gifted:

Bob Orr
Ruby Porter
Makyla Curtis
Vaughan Rapatahana
Olivia Macassey
Iain Britton
Selina Tusitala Marsh

The City Itself review

MICHAEL S. BEGNAL has reviewed The City Itself, Billy Mills’s new collection.

The City Itself (Hesterglock Press, 2017), employs compact and intricate soundplay, occasional lyric flashes, documentary historical material, and even personal narrative in order to make an argument about the interplay between urban and natural spaces and human beings’ place in the network of things. Divided into five sections plus a “Coda,” the book might initially seem like a patchwork or amalgamation of unrelated pieces, but an attentive reading quickly reveals that certain overarching themes wend their way throughout: access to housing, humanity’s role(s) in the continuum of the environment, the ephemerality of existence, and language as a material (if imperfect) medium for knowing the world, among others.

The book’s first section, “A Short History of Dominick Street,” incorporates found texts on the subjects of living conditions and poverty in that area of Dublin, where Mills himself was born. Drawing on newspaper accounts and books, this material goes as far back as 1847 to document a series of bread riots, continuing on to focus on the deterioration of this once upscale part of Dublin (which descended into slum tenement housing by the turn of the twentieth century). Mills also incorporates transcripts of Dáil debates on these issues from the 1940s, 50s, and 60s. In so doing, he sets the stage for wider explorations of the need for home and shelter in what I guess we could term an impersonal universe, or perhaps more to the point a laissez-faire, free-market economy.

Read the rest of this erudite review by Michael here

Many thanks Michael.

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The Undeliverable by I.S. Rowley (A5 fully bound, 65 pages) price £9.00 + postage worldwide is out now BUY

Iain Rowley is the most difficult kind of poet to describe critically: a complete original. Readers of some of his kindred spirits — Mina Loy, David Jones, Lisa Robertson, John Wilkinson — will recognise in this writing the quality of a first-hand vision of everything, told in verse that moves only to extend intellectual and sensuous apprehension. In The Undeliverable, his first collection, he immerses the reader in a series of lyric and dramatic meditations on the ethical resistance that the figure of the midwife, empathetically present to the woman in labour, poses to the violently masculinist history of modernity and its fantasised acceleration towards an automated future without birth. Why is the ‘extractive economy’ his poetic subject? ‘is it so very critical / to sensible midwifery / to be traversed by / such vulnerability’ — is one answer. You will want to turn to a dictionary, a library, the internet and the world now to deepen your understanding, but only after having dwelt on the unforgettable verbal detail that gives these poems their tender, angry, palpable reality: from the sexual-imperial horror of ‘scabbards abraded shaft after shaft / by unslakable martial spirit’ to the wordless and fully human moment: ‘newborn crowning / from plenteous blackness / mother undiminished’. Jeremy Noel-Tod

I.S. Rowley crawled out of a North Notts spoil tip at the nadir of Thatcher’s reign, and is still finding their feet.

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The Intaglio Poems by Iain Britton (A5 fully bound, 76 pages, cover design by Kirsty Britton) price £9.00 + postage worldwide BUY.

“Iain Britton’s poetical writing entangles the personal human condition with natural process and cultural artifice. Human problems, frequently a question of reconciling self and other, are read in terms of place, landscape, image, the clutter and scenery of civilisation including gods and arts, to form a kind of totalising theatre of perception which can be close to emblematic. Actual and figurative remain perfectly distinguishable, but interact with each other in every detail, in an open theatre where acts are free to display their full nature and origins, the vast width of the inner life.” Peter Riley

Iain Britton is a poet from Aotearoa New Zealand. He was born and educated in Palmerston North. Since 2008, he has had five collections of poems, including pamphlets, published, mainly in the UK: Hauled Head First into a Leviathan, (Cinnamon Press) was nominated for Best First Collection category in the Forward Poetry Prizes, 2008. Further collections followed: Liquefaction, (Interactive Press, 2009), Cravings, (Oystercatcher Press, 2009), druidic approaches, (Lapwing Publications, 2011) Punctured Experimental, (Kilmog Press, 2010) and Photosynthesis, (Kilmog Press, 2014) Also, his work was included in the Shearcatcher Poetry Anthology published by Shearsman Books, 2012.